3.29.2012

How to Use a 60-degree Quilting Ruler - Tutorial




I love this ruler!!
I made this mug rug from scraps of 2.5" strips of juicy fabrics. It's so happy and fun!

To make this mug rug, which measures 8"x8" - I used about 15 different fabrics from my scrap bin. Each piece should be at least 2.5"x 4" to get at least one triangle out of it.
I used 32 triangles.


The arrow points to the strip width number. My strips are 2.5" wide. Line up the ruler so that the flat pointy end and the strip width lines are even with your fabric raw edges. You can start at either end of your fabric strip - it doesn't matter.
 

Cut along each side of the ruler. Not gonna lie, this is some awkward cutting. No matter how you position your fabric, you'll end up cutting toward yourself at some point. Just be really careful - use steady, even pressure and don't rush.

Flip the ruler 180-degrees so it's pointing the opposite direction of your first cut. Cut next triangle.

I'm going to show you two different designs - one that's a hexie and one that's scrappy. Here I've cut 6 triangles. They're all cut from the same fabric, so they look ....

a hexie!

But I don't want a true hexie. I want a scrappy mix of triangles. But in order to lay out the scrappy mix, you must first group your triangles into hexies. So using all of the triangles you cut, group them in a pleasing way.  

Next, fill in the empty corners with 2 triangles, points matching {pointy or flat points meeting}

This is where is gets a little tricky....
In the above picture, you see the hexie groups, right?
 Now you have to *stop* seeing hexies and start looking at rows.

This design is sewn together row by row, so begin with the top row of triangles. Keep your design layed out so that you don't lose where you are in the process. Just keep adding triangles to the row in the order that you had them in your layout.

To sew the triangles:
right sides together, points matching. Not only does the flat point in the triangle reduce bulk in your seams, but they're handy for keeping track of which direction your triangles should be sewn together. Always be aware of the points! Place the first triangle exactly how it will be oriented in the design. Then take the next triangle and place it on top, right side together and points matching.


Sew along the edge with 1/4" seam.


Flip open. Press seams open.








Keep adding triangles from each row until you complete the entire row. Press.

To sew the rows together, start in the middle and match seams. work toward the outer edge of the rows. Sew with 1/4" seam. Press seams open.


Trim the sides.

And square up.


Sandwich, baste and quilt.
I still have to bind this little baby, but it turned out kinda cute. Can you imagine a large quilt with these little triangles?
Dee-lish.
I still need to work on perfecting the seam matching in this technique, but I like a good challenge.

The possibilities with this ruler are pretty mindblowing. I'm pretty excited to really put this thing to the test.


8 comments:

  1. I need to play with my ruler. I like the bright colors. I want to do a kaleidoscope like scrappy piece. it would be fun to quilt.

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  2. Oh this is beautiful. Would love to make a full size version!

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  3. I've been enjoying my triangle ruler lately, too - made the same 8" block you did, only I lined it up a little differently and made a star pop out of the middle of it. You can see it at http://aspenhill.wordpress.com/2012/03/09/what-is-a-quiltlet/ .

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  4. Consider making a hexagonal mug rug. Really, it's the perfect shape. Some of my Chicago MQG are making these bigger hexies!

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  5. Hi Andie! I recognize some of those fabrics! :)

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  6. Very cute, Andie! Love your fabric choices. I have triangle rulers but rarely use them...have to add this to the list. =)

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  7. This is sooooo sweet. I definately must try this. Thanks for sharing such an interesting idea!

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